Toilet Training for the Kiddos

Toilet training strategies for children with autism:

• A child with autism may not be able to communicate a need to go to the bathroom, therefore body signals from the child, routines, and visuals might be significant aides.

• The child with autism may learn to use the toilet at home and be unable to adapt to a new situation easily.

• A child with autism may have sensory difficulties such as discomfort by the hard toilet seat, being afraid of water splashing, or want to play in or watch the swirling toilet water.

• Toilet training in public bathrooms may sometimes cause children with autism to fear the hand dryers, have problems with the doors, the noise of the toilet flushing, or any number of challenges.

• Toilet training a bowel movement is often harder and occurs less often. Some children go off alone and squat, some insist on wearing the pull-up or diaper to make a bowel movement, some fear that it hurts, some smear feces, and others want to be clean so much that they react to getting anything dirty on them.

• When toilet training rule out any medical problems and account for fears that may have developed due to pain from constipation or urinary tract infections in the past.

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